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English

Key Stage 3

English is the medium through which every subject is delivered. Thus, the teaching of English should enable every student to be able to communicate, using the written and spoken word to the best of their ability.  Our English department aims to provide a broad curriculum which allows students to challenge themselves, learn from different cultures and use this knowledge to build a successful future.

We understand that COVID has impacted students and their families significantly, and have made changes to our curriculum to help ensure that students are still able to thrive within their English studies, despite any disruption they may have faced.

KS3 topics:

Year 7:

Contemporary Fiction; History of language; Introduction to Shakespeare; Adventure and Detective Fiction writing; Media and Non-Fiction (Prejudice and Protest) and An Introduction to Poetry.

Year 8:

Study of American literature, such as Ghost Boys or Of Mice and Men; Closer study of a Shakespeare play, typically A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Poetry Conventions; Nineteenth Century Novels and the study of Play Scripts.

Year 9:

Study of war poetry, looking at famous war poets such as Wilfred Owen; Narrative writing, focusing on shaping a narrative; Dickens World and beginning the GCSE Literature course by studying either Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth or Othello. Students will also complete their English Language GCSE Speaking and Listening Assessment.

How many lessons per fortnight? 8

ILT:  Individually tailored spelling course pathway using Spellzone to be completed weekly. Accelerated Reader and Reading ILTs set termly.

Assessment: Formal assessments take place six times across the academic year. They are usually at the end of each half-term but smaller assessments can be conducted by the classroom teacher at different points throughout the term.

Out of classroom opportunities:  Theatre visits as well as involvement in the ‘Carnegie Medal Winner of Winners’ debate. We also have a visit from at least one author per year, examples include Chris Bradford, Alan Gibbons and Tanya Landman. As well as this, Year 7s get to receive a free book of their choice as part of the Book Buzz scheme.

Accelerated Reader is also encouraged throughout KS3 linking to House points.

 

Key Stage 4

The impact of the KS3 English curriculum at Dene Magna deliberately widens students' cultural understanding and encourages a range of reading - both literary and non-literary. At KS4 every student will study and achieve both English Language and Literature GCSE. Currently, a third of all sixth form students are studying an English course at KS5 indicating that they wish to pursue English further.

We understand that COVID has impacted students and their families significantly, and have made changes to our curriculum to help ensure that students are still able to thrive within their English studies, despite any disruption they may have faced.

Key Stage 4 topics:

Year 10:

Study of a nineteenth-century text, typically A Christmas Carol; Inference and deduction skills; Prose set text such as An Inspector Calls or Blood Brothers; Creative and functional writing.

Year 11:

Study of Anthology poetry alongside preparation for approaching Unseen poetry within the GCSE Literature exam. Spring and Summer terms are devoted to the revision of both Language and Literature and exam preparation.

How many lessons per fortnight? 8

ILT:  ILT is set once a fortnight, with the expectation that if none has been specifically set they should read independently. Typical ILT could be preparation for spelling tests, research or even timed written pieces.

Assessment: Formal assessments take place six times across the academic year. They are usually at the end of each half-term, but smaller assessments can be conducted by the classroom teacher at different points throughout the term.

 

Overview

Promote cultural capital and an appreciation of our literary heritage and extend students’ reading skills by studying both character and thematic development via a variety of texts. Revisit and consolidate the recognition of the various sentence structures taught at primary level and as students’ confidence in knowing and applying these various structures in their own writing develops, we teach how grammar can be varied for specific effects. 

ARP - Monitoring reading age and progression. Reading for pleasure in English lessons, for ILT and within tutorials. Bookbuzz, author visits, Chelt. Lit Festival.

Spellzone - individual programme of study 

They will develop their understanding of the different nuances of sophisticated (tier 2) vocabulary and use this to explain the effects of language and linguistic devices and structures.

 

Year 7

Scheme of learning

Links NC

INTENT

Content we want our students to learn

Rationale

 IMPLEMENTATION

How does this build on prior knowledge/How we will ensure our students understand this content

IMPACT

How do we know if our students know?

Which aspect of KS4 are we preparing students for?  How are we building Cultural Capital? Wider links

Contemporary Fiction

Understand increasingly challenging texts through:

  • Learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries.

  • Making inferences and referring to evidence in the text knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.

  • Checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense

Study of a whole text reading ability, comprehension and writing. Numerous discussion points.

(Assessment AO5 Lang Non-fiction AO6)

Whole text study - NC skills development from KS2. 

They will learn to explain writers’ attitudes and viewpoints and compare different perspectives in increasing detail so that they can engage meaningfully in a wide variety of text types.  They will also learn how different contexts — historical, personal and thematic — create meaning in a wide range of texts and this will enhance their cultural capital. 

Developing our students’ view of topics relevant to today from RSHE e.g. Life-affirming tales of survival to current news on human migration.

A whole text study early in the year enables us to identify individual student progress in all three disciplines. It also enables us to embed positive reading routines with our students. ARP/Bookbuzz


 

Introduction to Shakespeare

  • Studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these

  • Understanding how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play 

  • Making critical comparisons across texts.

Making students familiar with the key vocabulary used in Shakespeare. Giving them the confidence to understand the plot, characters, themes across key plays. Building the ability to use AO1 and 3 Lit confidently.

(Assessment AO1/3 Lit)

Students identify Shakespeare and know some information. This unit draws on building confidence with new vocabulary and how his plays follow patterns in terms of plot and character.

A range of extracts from a number of Shakespeare plays to identify a common theme as well as begin a historical understanding of the time and its impact on the writer and audience (Absorption - knowing key themes, vocab and context)

Understanding challenging texts.

Shaping student readiness for an endpoint at GCSE - step one of their journey (Comp 1 Lit).

Early in the year because students enjoy learning about the context as well as the new vocabulary (e.g. Shakespearean insults). Some primaries cover an outline of some plays, and so we build on this.


 

History of Language

  • Read historical texts and understand increasingly challenging texts through learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries.

Reading a wide range of texts from historical periods - Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare.

Challenging texts to widen understanding of structures across a variety of literature. (Assessment AO1/4 Lang)

Links to the previous unit - inspiring students with the breadth of literature available to them during KS3/4/5 and beyond.

Vocabulary acquisition - understanding word roots, etymology, spelling patterns.

Revisit of Shakespeare. Building confidence with challenging words/complex plots. Understanding of the wider canon.

Understanding how language changes through history and is indeed still changing. Discussion of the modern world and how language is still evolving.

Early vocabulary emphasis on deciphering unknown words - roots, synonyms. Encouraging a rich vocabulary.

Detective Fiction

 

Write imaginatively and plan, draft, edit and proofread through:  considering how their writing reflects the audiences and purposes for which it was intended.

The ability to create plot, character and setting using a particular genre of writing

Introduction to Nineteenth-century context and writing style

 

(Assessment AO5 Lang Fiction)

Building on how writers develop character, setting, the plot in the Contemporary Novel.

Students will develop their ability to write fiction with greater impact and control of how language is used for effect, adopting and adapting the different structures and conventions, such as those of the detective genre. Students will write with a full range of sentence structures in order to create effects and engage the reader. 

Developing an understanding of how to produce a believable narrative with suspense, climax and resolution. Preparation for Comp 1 Lang at KS4.

 

Early focus on writing narrative as one of the more challenging GCSE questions.

Media and non-fiction: Protest and Prejudice

  • Knowing the purpose, audience

for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.

  • Writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences, using a range of other narrative and non-narrative texts, including arguments, and personal and formal letters.

  • Giving short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point.

An introduction to perspective and a variety of accessible and engaging subject

To enable students to communicate effectively in discussion and to express themselves and form their own opinion.

(Assessment AO7,9 S&L)

 

Showing students that literature is used in a variety of different modern texts.

 

Links to new lang - previous unit.

Comparing perspectives and viewpoints by using a variety of media and non-fiction texts. 

Students will develop their understanding of what fake news is and how they can identify things like bias in various forms of media and non-fiction.

Up-to-date, relevant news can be used here for relevance.

Using current news to teach students about the media, how the media can use bias. Moreover, relevant issues can be discussed in class (RSHE).

 

Building confidence ready for GCSE with oracy - developing opinion and persuading others by using different strategies. 

 

Creating culturally educated students who challenge opinion.

An Introduction to Poetry

  • Knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning recognising a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used.

Poetry study begins with a focus on the varied devices, structures and forms of poetry

(Assessment AO2 Lit)

Recap poetry work at primary - e.g. Ballads

Students build on any work in poetry at primary and are taught to identify various structures, forms and devices used in poetry (Tier 3 vocabulary)

Students are assessed in two sections of their GCSE Literature paper (Unseen and Anthology) and so an early start on identifying elements of poetry alongside meaning is important.

 

Year 8

Over Key Stage 3, students will develop their ability to write fiction and non-fiction with greater impact and control of how language is used for effect, adopting and adapting the different structures and conventions, such as those of genre,  when describing and narrating a story or manipulating a reader’s response when conveying a point of view.

Students are introduced to classic texts from the British literary heritage carefully chosen to engage and broaden our students' cultural capital as well as prepare students for the complexity of texts at GCSE. Non-fiction study begins with a focus on subject that is accessible and engaging but which then progresses in complexity and nuance, both of the topics and of the writers’ perspectives through KS3 so that students are able to engage with the challenge of the non-fiction they will study for GCSE Language.

ARP - Monitoring reading age and progression. Reading for pleasure in English lessons, for ILT and within tutorials. Bookbuzz, author visits, Chelt. Lit Festival.

Spellzone — individual programme of study 

They will develop their understanding of the different nuances of sophisticated (tier 2 and 3) vocabulary and use this to explain the effects of language and linguistic devices and structures.

Scheme of learning

Which materials and skills/content will be covered and why?

INTENT 

How is the SOW a progression of previous learning?

IMPLEMENTATION

Which aspect of KS4 are we preparing students for?  How are we building Cultural Capital?

IMPACT

Literature in the modern society

Understand increasingly challenging texts through:

  • Learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries.

  • Making inferences and referring to evidence in the text knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.

  • Checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.

Seminal literature

The whole text study builds on skills from Y7 with a more complex text, which also tackles challenging issues - e.g. race.

 

(Assessment AO1/4 Lit)

Building on Contemporary novel

They will learn to explain writers’ attitudes and viewpoints and compare different perspectives in increasing detail so that they can engage meaningfully.  They will also learn how different contexts - historical, personal and thematic - create meaning in a wide range of texts and this will enhance their cultural capital.  

 

All reading skills are revisited and this builds incremental improvement in students’ skills.

Developing an understanding of racial issues in a predominantly white area. Challenging preconceptions. Using current debate to enhance relevance and understanding RHSE.

 

Students require whole text skills for both Component 2 Literature and Component 2 Language at GCSE.

 

Reestablishing good routines after the summer break.

Non-fiction - marginalised voices

  • Knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension.

  • Writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences, using a range of other narrative and non-narrative texts, including arguments, and personal and formal letters.

  • Giving short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point.

A progression in complexity and nuance, both of the topics and of the writers’ perspectives from Y7 so that students are able to engage with the challenge of the non-fiction they will study for GCSE Language.

(Assessment AO6 Language)

Building on Protest and Prejudice

Comparing perspectives and viewpoints by using a variety of media and non-fiction texts. 

 

Looking at how this is presented differently from the novel and how topics can be addressed in various different ways. 

 

Students will also focus on language use and how vocabulary shapes meaning.

 

A focus on the female voice (whole school). Building aspiration and ambition.

Developing an understanding of the female voice. Using current news topics and debates. Building a ‘Girls can’ attitude.

 

Continuation of a focus on building cultural capital for our students - widening their understanding of the world around them.

 

Building confidence ready for GCSE with oracy - developing opinion and persuading others by using different strategies.

Shakespeare - exploring theme and character

  • Studying setting, plot, and characterisation, and the effects of these

  • Understanding how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play

Study of a whole play - plot, character and theme - culminating in an essay response to a particular theme (women).

(Assessment AO1/2 Lit)

Building on Intro to Shakespeare

Students will read key scenes from an entire play to gain an understanding of developing plot, dramatic devices and conventions as well as be able to comment on character and theme. 

Students will build on their understanding of context and language from Y7.

Focus on the presentation of women linking to marginalised voices (previous topic). Treatment of women in the modern day RSHE.

 

Residential trip to London (Globe theatre) Widening cultural experience.

Global Poetry

  • Knowing how language, including figurative language, vocabulary choice, grammar, text structure and organisational features, presents meaning recognising a range of poetic conventions and understanding how these have been used.

How poets explore the same subject matter and theme in a variety of contexts.

 

Studying a range of global poems to increase cultural capital

 

(Assessment AO3 Lit)

Building on Intro to Poetry

Students will learn how to approach poems linked by a similar theme but a variety of contexts. Students will be on Y7 where they will be able to identify figurative language, structure and vocabulary choice as well as identifying implicit meaning and how poets create a sense of identity.

 

Students study a range of poetry at GCSE and need to be able to use the skills of poetry analysis for unseen material.

Continuing our focus on building cultural capital, we introduced this unit to present a variety of poets and poems from the global community.

Playscript study

Reading a whole play and understanding how the work of dramatists is communicated effectively through performance and how alternative staging allows for different interpretations of a play

How playscripts differ to other texts - identifying conventions and using drama to explore different plays.

 

(Assessment AO7, 8, 9 S&L)

Building on Shakespeare unit

Students will learn how to identify meaning via a different form of writing - identifying meaning from stage directions etc and how implicit and explicit details add to meaning. 

Students will learn to explore the skills already practised for the novel and poetry to identify theme, character and context

Students have studied play script within drama to pull on working memory.

Preparation for GCSE - playscript Blood Brothers/Inspector Calls.

Building confidence reading aloud in role.

Residential trip to London - West End show

Nineteenth-century novel

  • Understand increasingly challenging texts through:  

  • Learning new vocabulary, relating it explicitly to known vocabulary and understanding it with the help of context and dictionaries 

  •  Making inferences and referring to evidence in the text  

  • Knowing the purpose, audience for and context of the writing and drawing on this knowledge to support comprehension  

  • Checking their understanding to make sure that what they have read makes sense.

Extract study of key nineteenth-century texts to develop an understanding of context and new vocabulary in order to develop comprehension of historical texts.

 

(Assessment AO2/4 Lang)

Increasing the breadth of the texts studied to build on the Detective unit and prepare for GCSE study.

 

They will learn to explain writers’ attitudes and viewpoints and compare different perspectives in increasing detail so that they can engage meaningfully.  They will also learn  how different contexts - historical, personal and thematic - create meaning

Preparation for GCSE Pre-1914 text and also GCSE Language Comp 2 non-fiction.

 

Links to history and geography - Residential trip to London

 

Year 9

Scheme of learning

Which materials and skills/content will be covered and why?

INTENT

How is the SOW a progression of previous learning?

IMPLEMENTATION

Which aspect of KS4 are we preparing students for?  How are we building Cultural Capital?

IMPACT

War Poetry

  • Drawing on the knowledge of the purpose, the audience for and context of the writing, including its social, historical and cultural context and the literary tradition to which it belongs, to inform the evaluation. 

  •  Identifying and interpreting themes, ideas and information

How to analyse poetry, compare ideas and ultimately respond to a GCSE question. 

Getting the students used to what AOs are assessed for each component.

Sustained progress

 

(Assessment AO2 Lit)

Building on poetry units in Y7 and 8.

Using the skills of analysis and understanding meaning to approach a series of poems connected by the theme of war. 

Numerous conflicts during history are addressed (links to History)

Preparation for a trip to the Imperial War Museum

Enabling our students to access key historical points to enable AO3 understanding of GCSE poetry.

Cross-curricular link to history.

 

Students understand that their GCSE course includes some war poetry, which they will cover during this half-term.

Short story/ narrative writing

  • Write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure and information through:  

  • Adapting their writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences: to describe, narrate.

  •  Selecting, and using judiciously, vocabulary, grammar, form, and structural and organisational features, including rhetorical devices, to reflect audience, purpose and context, and using Standard English where appropriate.

 

Short story analysis of structure, plot, character leading to planning these things with stimulus and titles. 

 

(Assessment AO5/6 Lang)

Link to different writing experiences during KS3 Detective Fiction and playscript study - writing for a purpose and audience.

 

Building up to later GCSE narrative.

Identifying plot, character, setting via short stories to then create a narrative using the skills seen. Use of models to create effective structures, show not tell, authorial voice etc

Students have to create a narrative for their GCSE Language paper and find this difficult.

 

Students are given opportunities to develop their writing up to this end point. We offer extra-curricular opportunities to build imagination (Warner Bros Studios - Harry Potter trip), Spine Chillers competitions, having external authors come in for workshops etc.

Dickens’ world

Drawing on knowledge of the purpose, audience for and context of the writing, including its social, historical and cultural context and the literary tradition to which it belongs, to inform evaluation.

High quality 19th century texts.

Whole text comprehension and understanding of how context impacts on the text. Dealing with more complex texts and continuing the development of using evidence to support points.

 

(Assessment AO2/4 Lang)

Link to Nineteenth century novel and Detective

Students build on their understanding of context from Y7 and 8 to study a novel in its entirety from this period.

Builds up to Comp 2 Lit - nineteenth century novel. Focus on AO3 context as well as approaching whole text responses on theme and character.

Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of this time period during Y7 and 8 to then complement their understanding at GCSE. This creates a working memory of context and how it impacts on what they read.

This also complements the Language paper.

GCSE Speaking and Listening

Planning for different purposes and audiences, including selecting and organising information and ideas effectively and persuasively for formal spoken presentations and debates.

To enable students to communicate effectively in discussion and to express themselves and form their own opinions

Link to Y7 (speech - personal response to text) and Y8 (playscript)

This will function as the students’ GCSE S&L presentation with questions, assessed and recorded by the class teacher.

Building confidence and a student’s ability to present information in an organised and clear way.

 

Making students aware of the importance of clear verbal communication beyond KS4/5.

 

Year 10

Scheme of learning

Which materials and skills/content will be covered and why?

INTENT

How is the SOW a progression of previous learning?

IMPLEMENTATION

Which aspect of KS4 are we preparing students for?  How are we building Cultural Capital?

IMPACT

Post-1914 Prose/Drama

Works from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries

Study of GCSE Post-1914 text

Developing understanding of plot, character, theme, structure to engage with a GCSE question

Using skills learnt in KS3 -

exploring aspects of plot, characterisation, events and settings, the relationships between them and their effects.

 

Modelling of responses and using teacher expertise to support students in producing answers that meet AOs

Repeated reading for depth of understanding - increasing working memory of quotations, plot etc.

 

Theatre trip to see drama text - develop understanding.

 

Increase writing stamina.

Poetry anthology/Unseen

 

Poetry since 1789, including representative Romantic poetry

Study of GCSE Poetry anthology and then comparison of poems.

Using these skills to approach Unseen poetry. Enabling students to engage with GCSE responses.

Linking back to KS3 skills built

Making critical comparisons, referring to the contexts, themes, characterisation, style and literary quality of texts, and drawing on knowledge and skills from wider reading.

Low stakes testing of quotations, plot etc to help support revision and increase working memory.

Pre-1914 text

 

Works from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries

Study of a Pre-1914 text

Developing understanding of plot, character, theme and context to engage with a GCSE question

Linking back to KS3 units

Drawing on knowledge of the purpose, audience for and context of the writing, including its social, historical and cultural context and the literary tradition to which it belongs, to inform evaluation.

Theatre trip to see performance of text.

Language Component 1

 

Works from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries

Developing the skills of identifying implicit and explicit information and writing responses that respond to Identify, What impressions, How, Evaluate questions with supporting quotations.

Writing successful narratives

Study of how to seek and select evidence in the text to support a point of view, including justifying inferences with evidence. 

 

Creating narratives based on specified titles.

Creative writing - different writing experiences leading to end goal

 

Use of relevant news topics for reading questions/writing stimulus.

Shakespeare

 

At least one play by Shakespeare

Study of a play to be able to analyse a specific extract and then write an essay on character or theme.

Link back to KS3 units where students were given the opportunity to practice this particular component.

Stratford upon Avon RSC Workshops on chosen text to support.

Language Component 2

 

Works from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries

Study of and comparison of texts from the 19th and 21st century. Practice of Identify and How questions as well as comparative questions.

Study of non-fiction text types and practice of writing these text types.

Studying how to adapt their writing for a wide range of purposes and audiences: to describe, narrate, explain, instruct, give and respond to information, and argue.

Linking back to KS3 - units on the nineteenth century in preparation for this paper.

Use of relevant news topics for reading questions/writing stimulus.

 

Year 11

Scheme of learning

Which materials and skills/content will be covered and why?

INTENT

How is the SOL a progression of previous learning?

IMPLEMENTATION

Which aspect of KS4 are we preparing students for?  How are we building Cultural Capital?

IMPACT

Revision Comp 1 Lit/Comp 2 Unseen Poetry

Revision of the most difficult elements of the Literature papers.

Revision of both poetry elements at the same time.

Working memory - low stakes testing for incremental improvement of quotations, plot etc.

 

Practice papers and Trials

Re-reading literature and other writing as a basis for making comparisons
Revision of Component 1/ 2 Language Repeated focus on the question types to build marks Timed questions/responses/modelling Personalised feedback to ensure progression
Revision of Comp 2 Lit - Post-1914 and Pre-1914 texts Revision of Component 2 Literature Drawing on 19th century knowledge from revision of Comp 2 Lang paper to support AO3 in A Christmas Carol More working memory of quotations and greater depth of responses.

 

Year 12

Scheme of learning

Which materials and skills/content will be covered and why?

INTENT

How is the SOL a progression of previous learning?

IMPLEMENTATION

Which aspect of KS3, 4 or 5 are we preparing students for?  How are we building Cultural Capital?

IMPACT

English Literature

Introduce the genre Dystopia

Handmaid’s Tale

1984

Shakespeare and Poetry

Paper 1 

Building on GCSE knowledge of Shakespeare and the skills AO1, 2, 5

Study of the set text whilst also practising the new skill AO5 across both papers

Paper 2

Building on GCSE skills of AO1, 2, 3, 4 and building in the added skill of AO5

Study the set texts whilst also building in contextual and critical understanding of texts. 

Comparative skills are built across text discussion.

Preparation for KS5 end exams.

Skill preparation for university courses

Create an ethos of the more they know, the more they learn and therefore building up an expectation of wider reading to enhance the course.

Opportunity for theatre trips, visits to Stratford, London, British library as well as potential university courses - raising aspiration in a community where university is not common.

English Language and Literature

Frankenstein

Great Gatsby - re-creative writing

Paris Anthology

Browning poetr

Study of linguistics and then how to apply this to the texts - poetry, drama, novel.

Comparison across texts

AO1, 2, 3

Preparation for KS5 end exams

Skill preparation for university courses

Create an ethos of the more they know, the more they learn and therefore building up an expectation of wider reading to enhance the course.

Opportunity for theatre trips, visits to Stratford, London, British library as well as potential university courses - raising aspiration in a community where university is not common.

 

Year 13

Scheme of learning

Which materials and skills/content will be covered and why?

INTENT

How is the SOW a progression of previous learning?

IMPLEMENTATION

Which aspect of KS4 are we preparing students for?  How are we building Cultural Capital?

IMPACT

English Literature

Drama 

Coursework 

Revision

Coursework completion - drawing on the breadth of literature since Y7

Comparison across poetry and drama - drawing on GCSE skills and added elements practiced during Y12

Revision of exam questions. Modelled responses, oracy of thinking, essay skills and revision techniques.

As above
English Language and Literature

All My Sons

Paris Anthology

Browning poetry

Revision

Coursework completion

Revision of exam questions. Modelled responses, oracy of thinking, essay skills and revision techniques.

As above